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Detox Bath

One casualty of the hurry, hurry modern lifestyle is the regular practices of highly beneficial and therapeutic detox baths.

A quick shower in the morning or after working out has gained favor over a more leisurely soak with bathing ingredients carefully chosen to support internal cleansing, overall health and even to remedy specific ailments or injuries.

The Japanese in particular greatly value cleansing, detox baths, so much so that public baths remain popular even today.  The Japanese favor using water as hot as a person can possibly stand with a special type of cloth used to exfoliate and thereby encourage detoxification via the body’s largest organ – the skin.

According to nutritional pioneer Dr. Hazel Parcells, 65% of body cleansing is achieved via the skin!

In America, bathing is viewed more for relaxation than detoxification as a general rule. The focus on bathing enjoyment can be observed at bed and bath stores where a plethora of artificially scented, hormone disrupting bubble bath concoctions are creatively displayed and are best sellers year round.

I would venture to suggest that health couldn’t easily be maintained over the long term without the regular incorporation of detox baths.  If traditional cultures valued therapeutic cleansing baths back when our world was pristine with clean water, air, and unprocessed, additive free food, one can only imagine how important a gentle and regular detoxification bathing protocol is today given our toxic soup world with chemicals and other biologically disrupting agents nearly everywhere!

If the body is clogged up with toxins from the physiological stress of modern living and the chemical assault from every direction, it cannot properly utilize the nutrient dense food that is consumed.

 

 

How Detox Baths Work

detoxbath02The reason water as hot as can be tolerated is typically used is because this initially draws toxins to the surface of the skin, as described by Dr. Hazel Parcells in her book The Pioneer Nutritionist  Dr. Hazel Parcells in Her Own Words. Then, as the water gradually cools down, the toxins are pulled into the water via the principle of osmosis – the weak energy from the cooling water draws from the strong energy from the body heated up initially by the very hot water.

Generally speaking, a cleansing bath 2-3 times per week with only one per day maximum works well for most people to keep elimination channels open and gently encourage the detoxification process on a regular basis.

Cleansing, soothing and cooling fresh juice will be served after the detox bath.

 

RSVP